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Author Topic: Previous Versions of HTML  (Read 3297 times)

March 09, 2016, 02:22:02 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Previous Versions of HTML
« on: March 09, 2016, 02:22:02 PM »
HTML 4.0
    First released as a W3C Recommendation on 18 December 1997. A second release was issued on 24 April 1998 with changes limited to editorial corrections. This specification has now been superseded by HTML 4.01.
HTML 3.2
    W3C's first Recommendation for HTML which represented the consensus on HTML features for 1996. HTML 3.2 added widely-deployed features such as tables, applets, text-flow around images, superscripts and subscripts, while providing backwards compatibility with the existing HTML 2.0 Standard.
HTML 2.0
    HTML 2.0 (RFC 1866) was developed by the IETF's HTML Working Group, which closed in 1996. It set the standard for core HTML features based upon current practice in 1994. Note that with the release of RFC 2854, RFC 1866 has been obsoleted and its current status is HISTORIC.

ISO HTML

ISO/IEC 15445:2000 is a subset of HTML 4, standardized by ISO/IEC. It takes a more rigorous stance for instance, an h3 element can't occur after an h1 element unless there is an intervening h2 element. Roger Price and David Abrahamson have written a user's guide to ISO HTML.

March 09, 2016, 02:22:13 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2016, 02:22:13 PM »
Other Public Drafts

The current editors' drafts of all specifications are linked to from a separate drafts page.

If you have any comments on any of our specifications we would like to hear from you via email. Please send your comments to: www-html-editor@w3.org (archive). Don't forget to include XHTML in the subject line.

March 09, 2016, 02:22:26 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2016, 02:22:26 PM »
XHTML 2.0

XHTML 2.0 is a markup language intended for rich, portable web-based applications. While the ancestry of XHTML 2.0 comes from HTML 4, XHTML 1.0, and XHTML 1.1, it is not intended to be 100% backwards compatible with its earlier versions. Application developers familiar with its earlier ancestors will be comfortable working with XHTML 2.0.

XHTML 2.0 is a member of the XHTML Family of markup languages. It is an XHTML Host Language as defined in Modularization of XHTML. As such, it is made up of a set of XHTML Modules that together describe the elements and attributes of the language, and their content model. XHTML 2.0 updates many of the modules defined in Modularization of XHTML, and includes the updated versions of all those modules and their semantics.

XHTML 2.0 essentially consists of a packaging of several parts currently independently proceeding to recommendation:

    RDFa
    XForms
    Access
    Role
    XML Events

plus the necessary text and hyperlinking modules, which you will find in the XHTML2 draft.

The most recent editor's draft can always be found on the XHTML2 WG's drafts page.

March 09, 2016, 02:22:41 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2016, 02:22:41 PM »
An XHTML + MathML + SVG Profile

An XHTML+MathML+SVG profile is a profile that combines XHTML 1.1, MathML 2.0 and SVG 1.1 together. This profile enables mixing XHTML, MathML and SVG in the same document using XML namespaces mechanism, while allowing validation of such a mixed-namespace document.

This specification is a joint work with the SVG Working Group, with the help from the Math WG.

March 09, 2016, 02:22:59 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2016, 02:22:59 PM »
XFrames

XFrames is an XML application for composing documents together, replacing HTML Frames. XFrames is not a part of XHTML per se, that allows similar functionality to HTML Frames, with fewer usability problems, principally by making the content of the frameset visible in its URI.
HLink

    The HLink module defined in this specification provides XHTML Family Members with the ability to specify which attributes of elements represent Hyperlinks, and how those hyperlinks should be traversed, and extends XLink use to a wider class of languages than those restricted to the syntactic style allowed by XLink.

XHTML Media Types

    This document summarizes the best current practice for using various Internet media types for serving various XHTML Family documents. In summary, 'application/xhtml+xml' SHOULD be used for XHTML Family documents, and the use of 'text/html' SHOULD be limited to HTML-compatible XHTML 1.0 documents. 'application/xml' and 'text/xml' MAY also be used, but whenever appropriate, 'application/xhtml+xml' SHOULD be used rather than those generic XML media types.

March 09, 2016, 02:23:13 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2016, 02:23:13 PM »
XHTML 1.0 in XML Schema

This document describes non-normative XML Schemas for XHTML 1.0. These Schemas are still work in progress, and this document does not change the normative definition of XHTML 1.0.
XHTML2 Working Group Roadmap

    This describes the timeline for deliverables of the XHTML2 working group. It used to be a W3C NOTE but has now been moved to the MarkUp area for easier maintenance.

March 09, 2016, 02:23:33 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2016, 02:23:33 PM »
Issue tracking

There are two sets of issues being tracked:

XHTML2 Issue Tracking System
    This database is dedicated to XHTML2 issues.
Voyager Issue Tracking System
    This database contains issues for all other specs.

March 09, 2016, 02:23:46 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2016, 02:23:46 PM »
Useful information for HTML/XHTML authors
Tutorials

    Getting started with HTML by Dave Raggett is a short introduction to writing HTML, including tutorials on advanced features.
    Adding a touch of style by Dave Raggett is a short guide to styling your Web pages.
    XHTML Modules and Markup Languages - How to create XHTML Family modules and markup languages for fun and profit by Shane McCarron explains how to create XHTML Family modules and markup languages, based on Modularization of XHTML.
    XML Events for HTML Authors by Steven Pemberton is a quick introduction to XML Events for HTML authors, explaining how XML Events are the same as HTML Event handling (onclick etc), but written differently.
    XForms for HTML Authors Part 1 and Part 2 by Steven Pemberton is a quick introduction to writing XForms, leveraging the reader's existing knowledge of HTML Forms.

March 09, 2016, 02:24:01 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2016, 02:24:01 PM »
Slides on XHTML

You may also be interested in the following slides on XHTML:

    XHTML: The Extensible Hypertext Markup Language by Dave Raggett, at W3C LA event in Stockholm, 24 March 1999.
    W3C HTML Activity by Dave Raggett, as part of WWW8 W3C Track, 12 May 1999
    W3C Work on XHTML by Dave Raggett, at XML '99, 6 December 1999. The presentation describes the work being done by W3C on XHTML.
    The XHTML Family (in ???/Japanese) by Masayasu Ishikawa, at SFC Open Research Forum 2001, 21 September 2001.
    XForms, XHTML and Device Independence by Steven Pemberton, at W3C.DE-Arbeitstreffen: Cross Media Publishing, 11 April 2002.
    XHTML Family by Masayasu Ishikawa, as part of WWW2002 W3C Track, 9 May 2002. Slides are available in XHTML or HTML (XHTML version needs XHTML+MathML+SVG+Ruby support).
    XHTML 2.0 (in ???/Japanese) by Masayasu Ishikawa, at SFC Open Research Forum 2002, 22 November 2002.
    XHTML 2.0 and XForms by Steven Pemberton, as part of WWW2003 W3C Track, 21 May 2003.
    W3C's Horizontal Activities Usage: XHTML Family Case Study by Steven Pemberton, WWW2003 W3C Track, 23 May 2003.
    XHTML and XForms by Steven Pemberton, at Zomersessie van NGI Limburg: XHTML2 en XForms, state of the art en stage-ervaringen bij het W3C, 3 July 2003.
    XHTML2 and XForms by Steven Pemberton, organized by the German and Austrian Office, 19 April 2005.
    The Semantic Browser: Improving the User Experience by Mark Birbeck and Steven Pemberton, WWW2005 W3C Track, 13 May 2005.
    Metadata in XHTML2 by Steven Pemberton, at News Standards Summit 2005, 24 May 2005.
    XHTML2: Accessible, Usable, Device Independent and Semantic by Steven Pemberton and Mark Birbeck, at XTech 2005 Conference, 26 May 2005.

March 09, 2016, 02:24:15 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2016, 02:24:15 PM »
Guidelines for authoring

Here are some rough guidelines for HTML authors. If you use these, you are more likely to end up with pages that are easy to maintain, look acceptable to users regardless of the browser they are using, and can be accessed by the many Web users with disabilities. Meanwhile W3C have produced some more formal guidelines for authors. Have a look at the detailed Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0.

    A question of style sheets. For most people the look of a document - the color, the font, the margins - are as important as the textual content of the document itself. But make no mistake! HTML is not designed to be used to control these aspects of document layout. What you should do is to use HTML to mark up headings, paragraphs, lists, hypertext links, and other structural parts of your document, and then add a style sheet to specify layout separately, just as you might do in a conventional Desk Top Publishing Package. That way, not only is there a better chance of all browsers displaying your document properly, but also, if you want to change such things as the font or color, it's really simple to do so. See the Touch of style.
    FONT tag considered harmful! Many filters from word-processing packages, and also some HTML authoring tools, generate HTML code which is completely contrary to the design goals of the language. What they do is to look at a document almost purely from the point of view of layout, and then mimic that layout in HTML by doing tricks with FONT, BR and   (non-breaking spaces). HTML documents are supposed to be structured around items such as paragraphs, headings and lists. Yet some of these documents barely have a paragraph tag in sight!

    The problem comes when the content of pages needs to be updated, or given a new layout, or re-cast in XML (which is now to be the new mark-up language). With proper use of HTML, such operations are not difficult, but with a muddle of non-structural tags it's quite a different matter; maintenance tasks become impractical. To correct pages suffering from injudicious use of FONT, try the HTML Tidy program, which will do its best to put things right and generate better and more manageable HTML.
    Make your pages readable by those with disabilities. The Web is a tremendously useful tool for the visually impaired or blind user, but bear in mind that these users rely on speech synthesizers or Braille readers to render the text. Sloppy mark-up, or mark-up which doesn't have the layout defined in a separate style sheet, is hard for such software to deal with. Wherever possible, use a style sheet for the presentational aspects of your pages, using HTML purely for structural mark-up.

    Also, remember to include descriptions with each image, and try to avoid server-side image maps. For tables, you should include a summary of the table's structure, and remember to associate table data with relevant headers. This will give non-visual browsers a chance to help orient people as they move from one cell to the next. For forms, remember to include labels for form fields.

Do look at the accessibility guidelines for a more detailed account of how to make your Web pages really accessible.

March 09, 2016, 02:24:34 PM
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EvilSpiriT

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Re: Previous Versions of HTML
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2016, 02:24:34 PM »
W3C Markup Validation Service

To further promote the reliability and fidelity of communications on the Web, W3C has introduced the W3C Markup Validation Service at http://validator.w3.org/.

Content providers can use this service to validate their Web pages against the HTML and XHTML Recommendations, thereby ensuring the maximum possible audience for their Web pages. It also supports XHTML Family document types such as XHTML+MathML and XHTML+MathML+SVG, and also other markup vocabularies such as SVG.

Software developers who write HTML and XHTML editing tools can ensure interoperability with other Web software by verifying that the output of their tool complies with the W3C Recommendations for HTML and XHTML.
HTML Tidy

HTML Tidy is a stand-alone tool for checking and pretty-printing HTML that is in many cases able to fix up mark-up errors, and also offers a means to convert existing HTML content into well-formed XML, for delivery as XHTML. HTML Tidy was originally written by Dave Raggett, and it is now maintained as an open source project at SourceForge by a group of volunteers.

There is an archived public mailing list html-tidy@w3.org. Please send bug reports / suggestions on HTML Tidy to this mailing list.

 

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